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Chinese Temples Committee
 

Shing Wong Temple, Shau Kei Wan

 
Shing Wong Temple, Shau Kei Wan
 

The temple situated at the junction of Shau Kei Wan Main Street East and Kam Wa Street was built in 1877. It was formerly called the Fook Tak Chi (福德祠) ("Fook Tak" refers to a place where people pray for blessings and virtues from To Ti – the Earth God). After an expansion project by the Chinese Temples Committee in 1974, it was renamed as Shing Wong Temple.

Shing Wong (also named as Cheng Huang) - The City God (城隍)

Shing Wong is a god who protects a city. The work of Shing Wong is to manage the ghosts and spirits of the district under his charge and to maintain peace and order in both the Hades and living worlds.

Architectural Setting

The temple follows a Chinese two-hall vernacular building structure where fence off from a park and road outside. It consists of a main hall shaped like a Chinese Pavilion. Originally it overlooked the sea and its back was protected by the hill. After an urban development proposed in Shau Kei Wan, the temple is now tucked in the midst of the bustling market centre.

 
Architectural Setting

Other Deities

Other than the main deity of Shing Wong, the temple also houses Tai Sui (Sixty Gods of the Year), the Yamas of the Ten Halls (Ten Kings of Hell), Ng Tung (the Gods of Five Lucks) and To Ti (the Earth God).

Shing Wong & Related Festivals

Shing Wong Festival – the 11th May and 24th July in Lunar Calendar Ng Tung Festival – the 5th January and 5th May in Lunar Calendar To Ti Festival – the 2nd February in Lunar Calendar

Renovations

This temple underwent renovations in 1876, 1902, 1920, 1948, 1974 and 2005.

Renovations   Renovations

 

 

Addresss:

Kam Wa Street, Shau Kei Wan, Hong Kong

Opening Hours

8:00am to 5:00pm daily

Public Transport:

Shau Kei Wan Station Exit B1 - walk along Shau Kei Wan Main Street East to Shau Kei Wan Terminus Kam Wa Street (5 mins.)

 

 

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